Agriculture, Food and Environment Course Descriptions



Core Courses

  • AFE 116 Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (2)
    This course familiarizes students with career options, necessary academic preparation, and how to search for a job in environmental science and agriculture. In addition to lectures, students will visit several environmental science/agriculturally related venues in central Kentucky. (one hour of lecture and two hours of lab a week including field trips). Credit: 2 semester hours.
  • AFE 117 Global Perspectives in Agriculture, Food, and the Environment (3)
    Students will explore agriculture, food science, and environmental issues across the planet and how these issues also impact people in the United States. Climate change, international challenges to food production, expanding international markets, global competition in producing food and energy, and international environmental challenges will be examined. (Three hours of lecture each week). Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 211 Introduction to Animal Science (3)
    This course provides the student with basic information on livestock production and management of food animals primarily cattle, goats, sheep, swine, and poultry. It will include information on alternative and conventional production of animals. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 215 Agribusiness Management (3)
    This course provides an introduction to the management of non-farm businesses in agriculture.  It includes: 1) the role of an agribusiness manager, 2) management as a strategy for long-term survival of a business, and 3) management of operations, marketing, financials, and human resources as part of an agricultural industry. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 217 Plant Science (3)
    Prerequisite: BIO 111. An introduction to plant structure, function, physiology, nutrition, health, growth, and genetics and interactions between crop production systems and the environmental science/agriculturally related venues in central Kentucky. (Two hours of lecture per week including field trips). Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 307 Animal Nutrition (3)
    Prerequisite: CHE 102/120.  This course will deal with the classification and functions of nutrients, deficiency symptoms, digestive processes, characterization of feedstuffs, and formulation of diets for domestic animals and pet animals. The course is designed for students majoring in Veterinary Technology.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 309: Livestock Reproduction (3)
    Prerequisites: AFE 211. This course will cover the estrus cycle and reproduction of common livestock species. Discussing the anatomy and physiology of reproduction as well as applied techniques in current industries.  Credits: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 311 Practicum I (2)
    Prerequisite: AFE 116 and Sophomore Standing.  Practicum in Agriculture, Food Science or Sustainable Systems.  A course in which advanced AFE students pursue an independent experiential project off campus. Credit: 2 semester hours.
  • AFE 340 Environmental Science and Agroecology (3)
    Prerequisite: AFE 211 and 217 with grade of C or better. This course is intended for those with theoretical and practical interest in environmental issues and is designed to provide a wide range of subjects and practical work experience using standard methods, concepts and equipment in environmental science.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 366: Climate Change Studies (3)
    The course provides the fundamentals of Earth’s climate system, and mechanisms of climate change as well as the methods that scientists use to investigate climate variability or change. It focuses on the Earth’s natural climate changes over the past and the role that humans have had in changing climates. Students will investigate the relationships between human activity and climate change and the consequences when human and natural factors interact. Students will use a Climate Change laboratory manual to explore weather related data, learn and investigate climate models and predictions. Students will explore possible technological solutions to these vast and increasingly important problems. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 401: AFE Seminar (1)
    Prerequisites: AFE 411 and Sr. standing.  This course aims at familiarizing students in the field of scientific communication, especially in scientific presentations of their research experience/findings in the various specialized course offerings at the College of Agriculture, Communities,  and the Environment. In addition to being trained in scientific writings, students will present their research results from AFE 411 in this class. Students may get an opportunity to present their research findings at professional meetings of various societies, depending on the opportunity presented. Credit: 1 semester hour.
  • AFE 411: Practicum II (2)
    Prerequisites: AFE 311, MAT 115 or 200, and Jr. standing.  Advanced research in Agriculture, Food Science or Sustainable Systems. A course in which advanced AFE students pursue an independent hypothesis driven research project on or off campus. Credit: 2 semester hours.
  • AFE 426:  Agricultural Economics and Marketing (3)
    Prerequisite: MAT 115 or MAT 176.  This course discusses economics, farm management, and marketing from an agricultural, and aquaculture, perspective. The focus is on economic relations that would apply to aquaculture and agriculture, in general. Most economics discussions will be presented by drawing graphs instead of writing formulas, although some formulas will also be discussed. The main goal is to prepare students to have the ability to manage a farm from a production, marketing, financial, and business planning perspective. Overall, the course will use a practical approach that would appeal to the understanding of most students.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 445:  Agriculture and Energy (3)
    Examine agriculture’s role as a producer and consumer of energy in context of the broader food system and economy. Explore potential to improve agricultural energy efficiency and produce energy on farms using solar, wind, hydro, bio-power, and biofuel technologies. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 450: Human Health and Environment (3)
    Prerequisites: BIO 111, CHE 101, and CHEM 110 or consent of instructor.  This course is intended for those interested in theoretical and hands-on training with a biomedical approach to the field of human health and the environment. Students taking this multidisciplinary course will have a holistic understanding of how the physical, chemical and biological factors of the environment impact human health.  Credit: 3 semester hours.

 


Option Requirements and Elective Courses

  • AFE 307 Animal Nutrition (3)
    Prerequisite: CHE 102/120.  This course will deal with the classification and functions of nutrients, deficiency symptoms, digestive processes, characterization of feedstuffs, and formulation of diets for domestic animals and pet animals. The course is designed for students majoring in Veterinary Technology.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 309: Livestock Reproduction (3)
    Prerequisites: AFE 211. This course will cover the estrus cycle and reproduction of common livestock species. Discussing the anatomy and physiology of reproduction as well as applied techniques in current industries.  Credits: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 404 Nutrition and Metabolism (3)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or consent of instructor.  Nutrition and Metabolism instructs students on fundamentals of basic nutrition and metabolic activity. Students will cover the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, protein, amino acids, and vitamin/minerals and how they are all interconnected. In addition, this class will explore the nature of metabolic diseases and how nutrition plays a significant role. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 405 Research/Extension in Nutrition (3)
    This course will provide substantial opportunities for students to learn about research education and Extension activities in the area of Nutritional Science. Students will encounter several topics in the area of nutrition and will have several opportunities for hands-on learning. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 407 Agroforestry: Local/Global Perspectives (3)
    Students will examine and have an understanding of how different agroforestry systems function with landscapes across multiple scales (plot, watershed, landscape) and how these systems contribute to achieving multiple benefits (environmental, social, economic, etc.). Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 415 Livestock Production Practices (3)
    Prerequisites: AFE 211.  Course will explore conventional and alternative production practices for the major livestock species produced in Kentucky. Students will learn about organic, forage based, and natural production practices and how they compare to conventional production. They will have hands-on experience with working with livestock to learn basic handling and management procedures. The class includes field trips to different farms and hands on activities. Credit: 3 semester hours. 
  • AFE 416 Nutrition and Society (3)
    As the prevalence of obesity and co-morbidities continue to rise in the United States, there is a strong need for individuals trained in community nutrition education as well as science. This course is dedicated to teaching students the principles behind nutrition education, epidemiological factors, methodologies and pertinent organizations. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 417 Modern Nutrition and Disease (3)
    Prerequisite: FNU 104 with grade of C or better.  This course is intended for those with theoretical and practical interest in the field of Food and Nutrition Sciences, and will give an overview of the role of Nutritional Science as it relates to health with special emphasis on disease prevention and management of disorders and diseases of various body systems. Credit: 3 semester hours. 
  • AFE 425 Organic Agriculture (3)
    Prerequisites: MAT 120 or MAT 125 or consent of instructor.  Principles and practices of organic agriculture are presented in the context of their historical, philosophical, economic, and scientific underpinnings. Students will develop a broad theoretical and practical understanding of organic agriculture. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 435 Urban Agriculture (3)
    Examine contributions of ornamental and food gardens to community health and food system sustainability. Explore potential of compact urban agriculture to offset community food needs through high and low input production. Gain hands-on experience with tools, techniques and practices used to grow and process food and ornamental crops in urban environments. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 440 Ornamental/Landscape Plants (3)
    This course provides an understanding of the identification, morphology, classification, nomenclature and adaptability of ornamental plants in landscape environments. The use of plants in home, business, and park landscapes to reduce water use, pollutants, energy, and labor inputs is examined. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 442 Plant Propagation and Plant Production Systems (3)
    Prerequisite: AFE 217 or consent of instructor.  This course provides an understanding of both traditional plant propagation and tissue culture as well as sustainable plant production systems. Plant propagation is a critical part of nursery and greenhouse management not only to reduce production costs but also to maximize the potential profit. Sustainable practices and production of horticultural crops is also examined to reduce water use, pollutants, energy, and labor inputs. Topics covered also include soil, plant nutrition, pest and disease management that are essential for small scale farmers.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 443 Apiculture/Pollination Biology (3)
    This course guides the student through the biology and culture of honey bees and other important pollinators. The morphology, physiology, behavior, reproduction, genetics, breeding and ecology of honey bees are included. The application of the biology of honey bees is described, as they are important crop pollinators and producers of honey and wax. The biology of other pollinators, especially other species of bees, is compared to that of the honey bee. In particular, the relative merits of various pollinators are compared according to the plants they visit. Recent ideas and novel applications for apiculture are described. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 455 Food Safety and Microbiology (3)
    Prerequisites: BIO 111, CHE 101, and CHE 110 or consent of instructor.  This course in intended for those with theoretical and practical interest in the field of food sciences, especially those interested in a wide range of subjects and hands-on/practical approaches in microbial food processes, general food safety, public health  and epidemiology. Various aspects of food production, maintenance, supply chains, potential contaminations, introduction to food borne toxins and outbreaks of food borne infections, safe food handling and preparation  techniques will be introduced to the students.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 465 Food Systems (3)
    This course explores relationships among environment, food supply chains, security, quality, diet, and consumer health, with particular emphasis on system components after the farm gate. Discuss existing barriers to healthy and sustainable food consumption; and personal behaviors and public policies with potential to overcome these barriers. Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 485 Special Topics in AFE (3)
    This course requires intensive examination of an Agriculture, Food, and Environmental (AFE) science topic chosen by a faculty member in Agriculture, Food, and Environment. This course will require intensive reading and discussion, as well as writing.
  • AFE 489 Remote Sensing of the Environment (3)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.  The course introduces fundamental principles of remote sensing applications for recording electromagnetic energy from the earth’s surface for studying vegetation, soil, water, and urban infrastructure.  Credit: 3 semester hours.
  • AFE 485 Special Topics in AFE (3)
    This course requires intensive examination of an Agriculture, Food, and Environmental (AFE) science topic chosen by a faculty member in Agriculture, Food, and Environment. This course will require intensive reading and discussion, as well as writing.