Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix.  Each course description begins with a three letter subject prefix followed by a three – digit course number and the course title. The number on the right of each course description gives the semester credit hours for that course. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description.  Prerequisites are also listed.  A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student is permitted to enroll in the course.

Subject Prefix and Course Number
Course Name
Semester Credit Hours
Course Description
Cross Listed Course
Prerequisite
BIO 101Life Science3A general study of biological concepts of living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. (Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 103Environmental Biology3This course investigates the impact of humans on our
environment and the impacts on resource sustainability, biodiversity, and human health.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 107Anatomy and Physiology I4Study of basic chemistry, biochemistry, cell structure and function, tissues, the integument, and the skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. [Required for Nursing majors.] (Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 108Anatomy and Physiology II4A continuation of BIO 107 with emphasis on
the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, urinary, and reproductive systems. [Required for Nursing majors.] (Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableGrade of "C" or better in BIO 107; or consent of instructor
BIO 111Principles of Biology4Analysis of fundamental concepts underlying and unifying living systems. Emphasis on major principles of
cellular anatomy and physiology, reproduction and development, genetics, ecology, and evolution. (Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableEither completion of or testing out of remedial courses
BIO 112Exploration of Modern Topics in Biology
3Formal presentations and colloquia on biological topics of current interest. Concise overviews will be presented on the diversity of living systems, evolution, and life processes. (Three hours of lecture per week)Not ApplicableBIO 101 or BIO 111
BIO 115Freshman Biology Seminar1A seminar exploring the variety of careers in the biological sciences and closely-related disciplines; led by faculty, visiting scientists and practitioners.Not ApplicableBIO 111, BIO 101, or consent of instructor
BIO 116Careers in Biology3This course familiarizes students with career options,
necessary academic preparation, and how to search for job in biotechnology. In addition to lectures, students will visit several biotechnology companies in central Kentucky. (One hour of lecture per week plus field trips)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 204Fundamentals of Microbiology3Emphasis on infection by microbes, the body’s immune system, pathogens, and parasites. [Required for Nursing majors.] (Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableGrade of "C" or better in BIO 107 or recommendation of the Nursing Department.
BIO 210General Zoology3Introduction to the animal world, including taxonomy and diversity of kind, morphological and physiological organization of representatives of various phyla; and evolutionary relationships among phyla. (Two
hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111
BIO 212General Botany3Introduction to the plant world, including taxonomy and diversity of kind, morphological and physiological organization in various divisions, and evolutionary relationships among divisions. (Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableBIO 111
BIO 220Medical Terminology
2Designed to review common terms used in the medical professions.Not ApplicableGrade of "C" or better in BIO 101, BIO 107, or BIO 111
BIO 301Human Anatomy4A study of the anatomical configuration of cells and tissues forming neural, muscular, renal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, skeletal, and reproductive systems. (Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableBIO 101 or BIO 111
BIO 302General Microbiology
4Morphology, classification, distribution, and physiology of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms in industry and the environment. Aseptic technique, staining, cultivation, identification, and control of
bacteria. (Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111 and CHE 102 (concurrent), or
consent of instructor
BIO 303Human Physiology4Cells, tissues, organs, and systems in relation to each other and in coordination with contractility, conductivity, respiration, translocation of materials, and other problems in physiology. (Three hours of lecture,
three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 210 and CHE 102; PHY 207 and PHY
208 are recommended
BIO 304Vertebrate Embryology4Study of morphological and developmental aspects of embryology, including genetic and molecular mechanisms. The comparative developmental anatomy of the starfish, frog,
chick, and mammals are studied. (Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111 or consent of instructor
BIO 305Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy4Relationships of vertebrate groups and structure and significance of various organs and systems of typical vertebrates. Discussions of the history and habitats of various groups. (Two hours of lecture, four hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableBIO 210
BIO 307Genetics4Explores the laws and principles of heredity and genetic variation in organisms. Topics include aspects
of Mendelian genetics, quantitative genetics, and molecular
genetics, as well as principles of developmental, behavioral, population, and evolutionary genetics. (Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111 with a grade of "C" or better; and CHE 102 with a grade of "C" or better.
BIO 308Microtechniques and Histology4A lecture/laboratory course dealing with microscopic anatomy of various tissues in the human body. Theories of microscopic techniques and tissue development are also discussed. (Three hours of lecture,
three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111
BIO 309Parasitology4A study of epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and control of parasites of man and other animals. (Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week)Not ApplicableBIO 210 or consent of instructor
BIO 315Immunology3Immune system, immunoglobulin structure, antigenicity, antigen-antibody reactions, phylogeny of immune responses, and antibody
formation. Immunity to bacterial and viral infections, allergies, and graft- host reactions. (Three hours of lecture/discussion/ demonstration & laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableConsent of instructor
BIO 316Ecology4A study of the interrelationships of living organisms and their environment. This course draws from several disciplines and stresses concepts of modern ecology.Not ApplicableBIO 111 or BIO 101, BIO 210, BIO 212, CHE 101, CHE 102
BIO 317Medical Microbiology4Lecture and laboratory work in pathogenic bacteriology, virology, mycology, and parasitology. Emphasis on etiology, epidemiology, identification, and clinical diagnosis of pathogens. (Three
hours of lecture three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 302
BIO 318Hematology4A comprehensive study of the blood system, including the hematopoietic systems and disorders of the blood in humans. (Five hours of lecture/laboratory per week)Not ApplicableConsent of instructor
BIO 319Study Abroad Topics3 - 4This course is designed for biology major students to receive credit for an upper level biology course taught abroad through an accredited study abroad
program (e.g., CCSA, KIIS).
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 399Undergraduate Teaching Experience1Students earn course
credit for undergraduate teaching experience including but not limited to (1) assisting students during laboratory sessions, (2) helping to set up laboratories or lecture/lab quizzes, or (3) conducting PLTL-Excel type workshops for
students. Course may be repeated for credit.
CHE 399, COS 399, MAT 399, PHY 399Consent of instructor
BIO 401Biology Seminar 1Expose students to presentations of biological research by faculty and visiting scientists and allows students to formally present a research topic. Students are required to make a formal, oral presentation of
a research topic with computer-generated audio-visual materials.
Not ApplicableUpper-division standing; senior classification
recommended.
BIO 407Fish Genetics3An overview of fish genetics including basic principles and methods of selective breeding in aquaculture.AQU 407Consent of instructor
BIO 408Cell Biology4Cell structure and chemistry as it relates to cell function. Biochemical and molecular
aspects of cell functions are emphasized. (Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111 and either CHE 200 or CHE 302 with a grade of "C" or better.
BIO 409Biostatistics3Basic principles of experimental design and data analysis with emphasis on their applications in aquaculture research.AQU 409Consent of instructor
BIO 410Special Problems in Biology2A course in which advanced Biology students pursue an independent experimental or library research project. May be repeated once for credit.Not ApplicableConsent of instructor
BIO 411Fish Diseases3An overview of fish
diseases including the pathogens and conditions that result in disease. Preventive and corrective measures are also examined. (Three hours of lecture per week)
AQU 411Not Applicable
BIO 412Fish Morphology &
Physiology
4An overview of fish morphology and physiology with emphasis on comparative and adaptive aspects among Osteichthyes (true bony fish).
(Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
AQU 412Consent of instructor
BIO 413Aquatic Ecology4This course investigates the interaction of aquatic organisms with their biotic and abiotic environment. Sampling and laboratory methods of limnological; analysis will be covered. (Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week)AQU 413Not Applicable
BIO 414Basics of Fish Diseases3An online course with no lab. Students are introduced to bacteria, parasites, viruses and environmental factors that cause disease in aquatic animals, Prevention, identification and treatment of
these diseases are included (course intended for non- aquaculture majors).
AQU 414Consent of instructor
BIO 415Animal Behavior3This course examines the behavior of non- human animals from a physiological, ecological and evolutionary perspective. (Three hours of lecture per week)Not ApplicableBIO 111, BIO 210 and BIO 316
BIO 417Ecological Field Methods4Lecture, field and laboratory course emphasizing modern ecological field techniques. Compares quantitative and qualitative methods of sampling and interpreting data. (Two hours of lecture, four hours of
laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableBIO 111, BIO 210, BIO 212, CHE 101, CHE
102; BIO 316 recommended
BIO 421Fish Nutrition3Fundamental and applied aspects of fish nutrition including nutrient requirements, nutrient chemistry, ration formulation, and practical feeding will be taught. (Three hours of lecture per week)AQU 421Consent of instructor
BIO 422Principles of Aquaculture
3Introduction to principles underlying aquatic productivity
and management with a survey of domestic and foreign cultures of fish and aquatic vertebrates.
AQU 422Not Applicable
BIO 423Aquaculture Economics and Marketing
4Aquaculture economics, marketing channels and consumer preferences for fish products will be presented. (Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)AQU 425MAT 120 or MAT 125 or consent of instructor
BIO 427Fish Reproduction &
Spawning Techniques
3An overview of basic biology of fish reproduction and techniques of artificial spawning for common aquaculture species.AQU 427Not Applicable
BIO 431Biotech I: Tissue Culture3This course will familiarize students with aspects of plant and animal tissue culture including: historical development, basic techniques, safety issues, media formulation and
preparation, and culturing tissues. (Four hours of lecture/laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 432Biotech II: DNA3This course offers an introduction to the molecular tools used in DNA biotechnology including purification of nucleic acids, cutting and joining DNA, vectors, sequencing DNA, genomic and cDNA libraries, RFLPs, Souther Blots,
and PCR. (Four hours of lecture/laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 433Biotech III: Proteins3This course covers aspects of protein chemistry and immunology pertinent to biotechnology including: amino acid structure and analysis, polypeptide structure; protein sequencing, immunoglobulins, diagnostic application of monoclonal antibodies, SDS-PAGE, spectrophotometric analysis of proteins, and immuno-chemical methods of diagnostics. (Four hours of lecture/laboratory per week)Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 434Biotech IV: Advanced
Biotechnology
3This course allows students to utilize and extend previously learned biotechnological principles and techniques used in industrial research and development, with special emphasis on pharmaceutical and value-added products. (Three hours
of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 435Global Perspective in
Biotechnology
3This course critically surveys potential impacts of biotechnology from a global perspective, providing an understanding of issues and values information different
viewpoints on biotechnology. (Three hours of lecture per week)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 436Biotech Writing/Presentations3This course will focus on effective communication of ideas and research results in biotechnology, specifically publishing a scientific paper and making presentations at scientific meetings. Students will write a paper and present a talk on data they have been assigned at the beginning of the semester. (Three hours of lecture per week)Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 437Environmental Science and Bioremediation
3The fate and transport of pollutants in the environment and
their final destination, dilution, dispersion, adsorption, persistence, degradation, their adverse effects, and the route these pollutants take in the environment will be discussed and possible solutions and remediation techniques will be
presented. (Four hours of lecture/laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 438Forensics3Lectures focus on the fundamental principles and concepts
in disciplines of biology such as serology, entomology, and molecular biology relevant in forensic investigations. Students learn serological, microscopic, and DNA related techniques used in forensic sciences in laboratory. (Four
hours lecture/laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
BIO 451Survey of Production
Methods
3An overview of alternative production methods including ponds, cages, net-pens, raceways, and recirculating systems with application to suitable species. (Three hours of lecture
per week)
AQU 451AQU 422 or consent of instructor
BIO 460Water Quality Management3An introductory survey
of theory and practice into the understanding and manipulation of the biological, chemical, and physical aspects of water quality in aquaculture production.
AQU 460Consent of instructor
BIO 490Biological Practicum12An on-the-job clinical practice (Clinical Laboratory Sciences).Not ApplicableConsent of advisor
BIO 493Internship1 - 4An intensive experience in a biological/medical field involving practical on-site participation.Not ApplicableConsent of advisor
BIO 495Topics in Biology3This course requires intensive examination of a biological topic chosen by a faculty member in biology. Will involve intensive reading and discussion, as well as writing.Not ApplicableSenior status
Print This Page Print This Page