Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix.  Each course description begins with a three letter subject prefix followed by a three – digit course number and the course title. The number on the right of each course description gives the semester credit hours for that course. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites are also listed.  A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student is permitted to enroll in the course.

Subject Prefix and Course Number
Course Name
Semester Credit Hours
Course Description
Cross Listed Course
Prerequisite
PHY 130Physics and Society3A lecture and discussion
course about science topics in the news. Topics include terrorism, energy, nuclear energy and weapons, space flight, and global warming. The course
will look at the science behind the issues to see why we are where we are today and the science between possible solutions and non solutions.
Not ApplicableTesting out of all or successful completion
of all developmental courses.
PHY 207Physics in Biological Science I4A study of rigid-body mechanics, gravitation, friction, elasticity, harmonic motion, sound, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and kinetic
theory, with particular attention to living systems. Included
in the course are computer modeling and simulation exercises. (Three hours of lecture, two hours of
laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableMAT 120
PHY 208Physics in Biological Science II4Continuation of PHY 207,
with study of electricity, magnetism, electrical circuits, light, optical systems, molecular and atomic structure, and radiation. Included in the course are computer modeling and simulation exercises. (Three hours of
lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicablePHY 207
PHY 211General Physics I5Study of the calculus-based description of rigid-body
mechanics, harmonic motion, sound, thermometry,
and heat transfer. Included in the course are computer
modeling, simulation and programming exercises. (Four hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicableMAT 131, or consent of instructor
PHY 212General Physics II5Continuation of
PHY 211. Electricity, magnetism, electrical circuits and devices, optics, atomic and molecular physics, kinetic theory and radiation physics are studied. Included in the course are computer modeling, simulation and
programming exercises. (Four hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week)
Not ApplicablePHY 211 or MAT 132
PHY 305Electrical Circuits and Electronics for Engineers3Comprehensive
electrical engineering principles for engineering and
science majors. Topics include: Circuit analysis, power systems, electronic, digital logic, and instrumentation.
Not ApplicablePHY 212, MAT 132
PHY 311Statics3The analysis of gravitational, elastic, and frictional forces in static rigid bodies and structures. Included in the course are
computer modeling, simulation and programming exercises.
(Three hours of lecture per week)
Not ApplicablePHY 211 and MAT 132
PHY 320Engineering Thermodynamics3Equations of state, energy, enthalpy, and entropy of several fundamental physical systems; includes laws of thermodynamics
applied to these systems and to common engines. Included in the course are computer modeling, simulation and programming exercises.
Not ApplicablePHY 211 and MAT 132
PHY 331Introduction to Robotics3Introduction to robotics including the design, building, and programming simple robots. Included will be the basic science, engineering, and mathematics needed to
design and build a simple robot. Students will also be introduced to the topic of project management. The course is a combination lecture/laboratory course that will meet five hours per week for three credit hours.
COS 331, CIT 331Not Applicable
PHY 340Engineering Electromagnetics3Corequisite: MAT 231. Electric and magnetic forces; fields and potentials accompanying
charge and current in vacuum/
dielectrics/conductors. Motion of charged particles,
electromagnetic waves, electrical circuits and
devices. Included in the course are computer modeling, simulation, data acquisition, virtual instrumentation
and programming exercises.
Not ApplicablePHY 212
PHY 346Advanced Physics Laboratory1A laboratory course
where students perform advance experiments in physics. Topics include modern physics, optics, thermodynamics.
Not ApplicablePHY 211, PHY 212
PHY 350Electrical Circuits4Fundamental laws and principles for linear circuits whose elements consist of passive and active components used in present day engineering practice. Determination of sinusoidal steady state responses using algebra of complex numbers. [Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours]Not ApplicablePHY 212 and MAT 132 or consent of instructor
PHY 361Modern Physics3Corequisite: MAT 232. Kinetic theory of gases;
bonding forces (liquids/solids); statistical thermodynamics;
thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties;
photon and electron characteristics; atomic and nuclear structures and radiations. Included in the course are computer modeling, simulation, data acquisition,
virtual instrumentation and programming exercises.
Not ApplicablePHY 212 [PHY 320 is recommended]
PHY 381Undergraduate Research in Physics and Engineering1 - 4This course is designed to give pre-engineering
majors an opportunity to conduct independent research. A formal oral presentation of the findings of the student is required. May be repeated for credit.
Not ApplicableJunior standing in pre-engineering, mathematics, or chemistry and permission of the instructor.
PHY 390Special Topics in Physics3Selected topics
for individuals or small groups of students. For Applied Mathematics, Pre-Engineering. The course will be the senior exit activity using topics from the Engineering
in Training Exam. The course may be repeated
twice for credit.
Not ApplicablePermission of instructor
PHY 399Undergraduate Teaching Experience1Students earn
course credit for undergraduate teaching experience including but not limited to (1) assisting students during laboratory sessions, (2) helping to set up laboratories
or lecture/lab quizzes, or (3) conducting PLTL-Excel type workshops for students. Course may be repeated for credit.
BIO 399, CHE 399,
COS 399, MAT 399
Consent of instructor
Print This Page Print This Page