Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix.  Each course description begins with a three letter subject prefix followed by a three – digit course number and the course title. The number on the right of each course description gives the semester credit hours for that course. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description.  Prerequisites are also listed.  A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student is permitted to enroll in the course.

Subject Prefix and Course Number
Course Name
Semester Credit Hours
Course Description
Cross Listed Course
Prerequisite
HON 101Seminar I: Ethics and
Civilization
4Early civilizations of Egypt, the Near East, Greece and
China. Readings from the epics of Gilgamesh, the
Odyssey, Greek tragedy and history, Plato, Aristotle,
the Old Testament, Confucius, and Martin Luther
King, Jr. Open to non-honors students.
Not Applicable Not Applicable
HON 102Seminar II: The Spiritual Traditions
4Introduction to history from Roman times through
the high Middle Ages, with an emphasis on the development
of world religions. Readings from Virgil, the
new Testament, Boethius, Aquinas, Dante, Buddha,
the Bhagavad Gita, the Koran, and the poet Rumi
Achebe’s novel Things Tall Apart. Open to non-honors students.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 103Honors University Orientation1This course is designed to help honors students make
a smooth transition (academic and social) to University
life. The mechanics of the academic process, the
resources and facilities available to them, and the environment
in which they can develop new friendships
and enjoy new experiences are addressed; a service
learning component is required.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 121Math-Science I: Classical Geometry
and Astronomy
4Euclid’s Elements. Properties of straight lines, triangles,
and circles; application of areas; theories of ratio
and proportions; applications to astronomical phenomena.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 122Math-Science II: The Scientific
Revolution
4The origins of the Scientific
Revolution. The transition from ancient to early modern
astronomy and physics. Readings from Ptolemy,
Copernicus, Galileo, and others.
Not ApplicableHON 121
HON 131Beginning Classical Greek I3Study of grammatical structure and translation of selections
from Greek authors. This course fulfills 3
semester credit hours of the University’s foreign language
requirement. Open to non- honors students.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 132Beginning Classical Greek II3Continuation of the work of
HON 131, further developing translation skills. This
course fulfills 3 semester credit hours of the University’s
foreign language requirement. Open to non-honors students.
Not ApplicableHON 131
HON 141Language I: Nature and Principles of
Language 1
3Study of grammatic structure and translation of selections
form Latin authors. Consideration of the nature
and philosophy of language. This course fulfills 3 semester
credit hours of the University’s foreign language
requirement. Open to non-honors students.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 142Language II: Nature and Principles
of Language 2
3Continuing study of the nature
and principles of language by means of a serious
study of Latin grammar, vocabulary and more complex
specimens of Latin literature. This course fulfills
3 semester credit hours of the University’s foreign language
requirement. Open to non-honors students.
Not ApplicableHON 141
HON 143Writing Lab I1Study of the principles of good writing and practice in
writing organized, coherent, thesis papers.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 144Writing Lab II1Study of the principles of
good writing and practice in writing organized, coherent, thesis papers.
Not ApplicableHON 143
HON 201Seminar III: Human Rights in the
Early Modern World
4Introduction
to history from the Renaissance through
the French Revolution, followed by seminars on the
greatest books of the time. Readings from Chaucer,
Machiavelli, Montaigne, Descartes, Pascal, Shakespeare,
Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Open to
non-honors students.
Not ApplicableHON 102 or consent of instructor
HON 202Seminar IV: Self and Society in a
Multicultural World
4Introduction
to history during the nineteenth and twentieth
century, followed by seminars on the greatest
books of the time. Readings from M. Shelley, Thoreau,
Melville, Marx, F. Douglass, Joyce, and T.S. Eliot. Open to non-honors students.
Not ApplicableHON 201 or consent of instructor
HON 211Language III: English Narrative
and Dramatic Literature
3The literary uses of language in narrative and dramatic
genres, including medieval English epics, Shakespearean
tragedy and comedy, and modern African-
American fiction. Attention is given to literary
analysis and to effective composition.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 212Language IV: English Lyric
Poetry

3The literary uses of language in lyric poetry from the
English-speaking world. Attention is also given to
advanced composition.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 213Writing Lab III1The process, principles, and
methods of writing a research paper. The required
paper will be on a topic related to the student’s major
or professional goal.
Not ApplicableHON 144
HON 214Writing Lab IV
1Intermediate study of the principles of good writing,
with particular attention to and practice in writing a
research paper.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
HON 221Math-Science III:
The Mechanical Universe
4The triumph of Newtonian
mechanics and its significance. Concepts of mass,
motion, force, and gravity are explored.
Not ApplicableHON 122
HON 222Math-Science IV:
The Biological Revolution
4Evolutionary theory and its relation to genetics. The
background to and development of Darwin’s theory of
evolution. The search for the carrier of the genetic
code and the discovery of DNA. Readings from such
authors as Aristotle, Paley, Lamarck, Darwin, Mendel,
Watson, and Crick. Open to non-honors students.
Not ApplicableNot Applicable
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