J. Gary Elliott

photo of J. Gary Elliott   Associate Professor (2005)

   B.A., St. John’s College; M.A., The University of Louisiana–     Lafayette; Ph.D., The University of Louisiana–Lafayette

  Office: Carver Hall 130A, Kentucky State University, 400 E. Main    Street, Frankfort, KY 40601

   Phone: (502) 597-6721

   Email: gary.elliott@kysu.edu.


Background and Interests

Dr. Elliott taught in the division of Literature, Languages, and Philosophy from 1999-2006. He joined Whitney Young in the fall, 2006. As a member of the English Department, he taught courses in Composition and Literature, as well as Integrative Studies courses Special Topics. He has developed and taught courses in Folklore, Oral Tradition, and Comparative Mythology. In the honors program, he has taught the freshman seminars, and courses in writing and literature. His graduate degrees are in English with concentrations in Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Dr. Elliott is dedicated to the ideals of liberal and interdisciplinary education. His research interests include literature, art, film, oral literature and history, cultural studies, popular culture, and folk and popular music. He lives outside of Frankfort with his wife, Anne, a potter, and his daughter Ellie.

Presentations

Dr. Elliott has presented the following papers at academic conferences:

“My Key Won’t Unlock This Door: Sufi Mysticism and Sexual Impotence in Blues Lyrics.” Presented at the annual meeting of the American Folklore Society in Nashville, TN, 2010.

“The Progress of Wrong Knowing: Reflections of Socrates’ Tyrannical Soul in Euripides’ Rhesos and Medea.” Presented at the ACTC conference in Memphis, TN, 2009.

“Teaching The Bacchae: Tragedy, Horror, and Dionysian Affirmation.” Presented at the ACTC conference in Williamsburg, VA, 2007.

“Robert Johnson’s ‘Crossroad Blues’: Images of Yoruba Mythology on American Soil.” Presented at the Conference in African Studies in Frankfort, KY, 2000.

“Cowboy Neal at the Wheel: The Legend of Neal Cassady, Trickster-Hero of the Counterculture.” Presented at the annual meeting of the American Folklore Society in Milwaukee, WI, 1994.